Posts Tagged ‘international women’s day’

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By Kelley Dennings

In the face of the climate crisis, young people are starting to question whether they should have kids. Many are worrying about the planet their children would inherit, and what adding to the population would do to our already-suffering environment.

Research predicts one million species could go extinct in the coming decades due to climate change, habitat loss and other human-related pressures. Meanwhile reproductive rights face a barrage of attacks at the state and federal level.

Frankly, there’s a lot to worry about. But we also have a lot that gives us hope. In March, we commemorate women who have come before us through Women’s History Month and we celebrate International Women’s Day.

The start of Women’s History Month in 1981 harkens back to a time of congressional compromise. In 1981, there were only 23 women in Congress – compared to 127 today — and fewer women in the workforce overall.

The U.S. fertility rate in 1981 is nearly identical to now. And although women have more autonomy in many ways, access to family planning is still a political chess piece.

International Women’s Day, held on March 8 annually, is a global day celebrating the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. But it’s more than a celebration – it’s a call to action.

This year’s theme, #EachforEqual, is drawn from a notion of “collective individualism.” It highlights how individual actions, conversations, behaviors and mindsets can have an impact on our larger society. 

The intersection between individual family planning decisions and reproductive healthcare policies is the perfect example of how personal and collective action are intertwined. And the climate and extinction crises are bringing renewed attention to the effect of our growing population on the planet. 

While individuals are at the heart of reproductive rights and justice, there are systems in place that determine whether people have access to the knowledge and healthcare they need. That’s why it’s frustrating when individual and systematic change are pitted against one another. These aren’t “either/or” issues.  Our collective individualism can benefit everyone.

Not only do individuals need to feel comfortable discussing their family planning wishes with partners and health care providers, systems such as comprehensive sex education, to support knowledgeable discussions, and universal access to all forms of contraception, are equally important. 

Progress has been made in understanding how individual family planning, reproductive rights and the environment work together, but more could be done. 

The intersectional work around population is grounded in human rights, reproductive rights and social justice. Every individual should have access to contraception and education to plan if and when they want to have children to help prevent unintended pregnancies, improve the lives of families and protect the environment. 

To achieve that, activists must cross the political aisle, partner with family planning groups and bring justice for all into the fold.

Kelley Dennings moved to Washington, D.C. ten years ago and has worked with three environmental non-profits. She currently works at the Center for Biological Diversity where she highlights how population growth and overconsumption affect habitat and wildlife. She advocates for rights-based solutions to these problems such as voluntary family planning.

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By GraceAnne Casto

What is International Women’s Day?

International Women’s Day is a day when the social, economic, cultural, and political achievements of women are celebrated around the world. It is also an opportunity to accelerate gender equality in our present day. Despite all the advancements the global community has made toward respecting and recognizing women and girls, there is much more left to do. 

There is a long history of women, and men, celebrating March 8th globally — this day was first recognized in 1911. Every community and nation celebrate in their own unique way. For example, in Russia, March 8th is a combination of Valentine’s Day and Mother’s Day holidays. In Italy, it is popular to give yellow mimosa flowers to the women in your life. 

Despite the differences around the world, the common and core themes of the day are equality for women and recognition of the amazing roles women play.

#EachforEqual

The theme for International Women’s Day 2020 is #EachforEqual. This theme emphasizes the role each of us can play in achieving gender equality. We each can make choices, big and small, day-to-day, that impact how women and girls are viewed, which stereotypes are propagated, and the opportunities made available to different members of society. The hashtag #EachforEqual is meant to inspire and encourage us to examine our own actions and perspectives, and make changes to become a gender-equal world. What can you do in your sphere of influence to consciously advocate for women around the world? Write it down, strike the pose (see photo), and post to social media with the hashtag (#EachforEqual) to spread awareness and inspiration!

Sustainability, climate change and women

Ulrika Modéer, UNDP’s Assistant Administrator and Director of the Bureau of External Relations and Advocacy, and Anita Bhatia, UN Women’s Deputy Executive Director for Resource Management, Sustainability and Partnerships wrote an amazing blog post about climate action and the female gender for DC EcoWomen. It is well-established that sustainable development and gender parity are intertwined and interdependent. Recognizing this, the UN made their fifth Sustainable Development Goal:  “to achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls.” Women are often the most vulnerable to impacts of poverty and climate change. However, they often play a key role in how their families and communities can build resilience. Education, career opportunities, and healthcare advancements for women are cornerstones of achieving both gender equality and sustainable development.

Let’s Celebrate!

  1. Strike the #EachforEqual pose and post to social media, and share something you are doing in 2020 to contribute to gender parity
  2. Learn empowering self defense at the “Punch, Then Brunch! Women Empowering Women Through Self Defense” event on March 8th.
  3. Buy flowers or chocolates for the amazing females in your life – be sure to look for local or fair trade products (check out your local farmer’s market or neighborhood florist)
  4. Learn about the history of women’s fight for equality, or about current issues we face – check out this list of recommended reads.

How will you celebrate?

Let us know in the comments, or share how you celebrated this day with others at the next DC EcoWomen event!

Additional sources: 

GraceAnne Casto is a DC resident who works as an environmental planner. She likes spending time outdoors, cooking, and reading. Making small steps towards a more sustainable and ethical life is one of her passions.

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by Stacy Knight

As a marine scientist and conservationist, I’ve been inspired by many of the scientific greats—Charles Darwin, Gregor Mendel, and Edward O. Wilson. But I am proud to have a long list of inspiring women to look up to, as well. Throughout history women have fought to be recognized, pushed to make a difference, and augmented the norm. As with many industries, women in science struggle with equity in pay, opportunities, and recognition. Despite these imbalances, many major scientific discoveries are attributed to women. Because March is an important month for women with Women’s History Month, International Women’s Day (March 8), and the anniversary of the 1913 suffrage march in Washington (March 3), DC EcoWomen is celebrating women all month long. I would like to celebrate the following amazing women who have inspired me throughout my career and pushed me to make a difference.

Dr. Euginie Clark was a Japanese American marine biology rockstar! Like me, she was drawn to the ocean through a place accessible to all Americans—the local aquarium. This experience inspired her to become SCUBA certified, and during her career she performed more than 70 deep submersible dives. She earned a Ph.D in 1950 and dedicated her career to studying fish and sharks. Her passion to debunk myths and fears about sharks earned her the nickname “Shark Lady”. She helped create Mote Marine Laboratory, which focuses much of their research on shark biology, including the presence of cancer in the species. Reading about this research as a kid fueled my never-ending curiosity of elasmobranchs.

Dr. Theodora Colburn was a trailblazer for endocrine disruption research. Her seminal research showing that small concentrations of chemicals can alter human reproductive, metabolic, and immune systems is chronicled in the novel Our Stolen Future. Born in 1927, she spent her early career as a pharmacist and went back to school at age 51 to earn an M.A. in freshwater ecology and a Ph.D. in zoology. In 1985 she “started” her career with a fellowship advising Congress on science. Over the next several decades she directed research on toxicology and human health and testified about the effects of chemicals in front of Congress. My early research in an endocrine disruption lab was encouraged by her work, but today, more than ever, her efforts to push  for Congress to make science-based decisions, and her commitment to disprove industry claims with scientific evidence is inspirational.

Dr. Amanda Vincent is a Canadian marine scientist and seahorse guru. In 1996 she co-founded Project Seahorse, an international, non-profit organization focused on seahorse conservation and community-based sustainable ocean ecosystems use. Dr. Vincent’s recognition that coastal communities rely on ocean resources served as the foundation for her innovative ideas integrating local communities and social science into conservation needs for seahorses, such as marine protected areas and small scale fisheries. Learning about her dedication to protecting the ocean without excluding humans from its use was a pivotal moment for me, which drew me to the sustainability and conservation field.

DC EcoWomen celebrates women every day and we’d love for you to celebrate women with us all March long by sharing on Twitter and Facebook using the hashtag #celebratingwomen and #dcecowomen. We’d love to hear who inspires you and how you’re celebrating women. Let’s start a conversation!

Each one of us has the power to inspire, and what better way than through our signature event: EcoHour. Join us on the third Tuesday of every month at Teaism Penn Quarter for an hour of inspiring stories about career growth from women in the environmental field.

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Stacy Knight is a marine scientist and a DC EcoWomen board member. She recently moved to DC to apply her diverse science skills to the environmental policy arena, and currently works for the Consortium for Ocean Leadership on the Political Affairs team. A science nerd at heart, she loves nature, the ocean, and photography. In her free time, she can be found enjoying local restaurants, sampling craft beers, and taking landscape photographs.