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By Kelley Dennings

In the face of the climate crisis, young people are starting to question whether they should have kids. Many are worrying about the planet their children would inherit, and what adding to the population would do to our already-suffering environment.

Research predicts one million species could go extinct in the coming decades due to climate change, habitat loss and other human-related pressures. Meanwhile reproductive rights face a barrage of attacks at the state and federal level.

Frankly, there’s a lot to worry about. But we also have a lot that gives us hope. In March, we commemorate women who have come before us through Women’s History Month and we celebrate International Women’s Day.

The start of Women’s History Month in 1981 harkens back to a time of congressional compromise. In 1981, there were only 23 women in Congress – compared to 127 today — and fewer women in the workforce overall.

The U.S. fertility rate in 1981 is nearly identical to now. And although women have more autonomy in many ways, access to family planning is still a political chess piece.

International Women’s Day, held on March 8 annually, is a global day celebrating the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. But it’s more than a celebration – it’s a call to action.

This year’s theme, #EachforEqual, is drawn from a notion of “collective individualism.” It highlights how individual actions, conversations, behaviors and mindsets can have an impact on our larger society. 

The intersection between individual family planning decisions and reproductive healthcare policies is the perfect example of how personal and collective action are intertwined. And the climate and extinction crises are bringing renewed attention to the effect of our growing population on the planet. 

While individuals are at the heart of reproductive rights and justice, there are systems in place that determine whether people have access to the knowledge and healthcare they need. That’s why it’s frustrating when individual and systematic change are pitted against one another. These aren’t “either/or” issues.  Our collective individualism can benefit everyone.

Not only do individuals need to feel comfortable discussing their family planning wishes with partners and health care providers, systems such as comprehensive sex education, to support knowledgeable discussions, and universal access to all forms of contraception, are equally important. 

Progress has been made in understanding how individual family planning, reproductive rights and the environment work together, but more could be done. 

The intersectional work around population is grounded in human rights, reproductive rights and social justice. Every individual should have access to contraception and education to plan if and when they want to have children to help prevent unintended pregnancies, improve the lives of families and protect the environment. 

To achieve that, activists must cross the political aisle, partner with family planning groups and bring justice for all into the fold.

Kelley Dennings moved to Washington, D.C. ten years ago and has worked with three environmental non-profits. She currently works at the Center for Biological Diversity where she highlights how population growth and overconsumption affect habitat and wildlife. She advocates for rights-based solutions to these problems such as voluntary family planning.

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By GraceAnne Casto

What is International Women’s Day?

International Women’s Day is a day when the social, economic, cultural, and political achievements of women are celebrated around the world. It is also an opportunity to accelerate gender equality in our present day. Despite all the advancements the global community has made toward respecting and recognizing women and girls, there is much more left to do. 

There is a long history of women, and men, celebrating March 8th globally — this day was first recognized in 1911. Every community and nation celebrate in their own unique way. For example, in Russia, March 8th is a combination of Valentine’s Day and Mother’s Day holidays. In Italy, it is popular to give yellow mimosa flowers to the women in your life. 

Despite the differences around the world, the common and core themes of the day are equality for women and recognition of the amazing roles women play.

#EachforEqual

The theme for International Women’s Day 2020 is #EachforEqual. This theme emphasizes the role each of us can play in achieving gender equality. We each can make choices, big and small, day-to-day, that impact how women and girls are viewed, which stereotypes are propagated, and the opportunities made available to different members of society. The hashtag #EachforEqual is meant to inspire and encourage us to examine our own actions and perspectives, and make changes to become a gender-equal world. What can you do in your sphere of influence to consciously advocate for women around the world? Write it down, strike the pose (see photo), and post to social media with the hashtag (#EachforEqual) to spread awareness and inspiration!

Sustainability, climate change and women

Ulrika Modéer, UNDP’s Assistant Administrator and Director of the Bureau of External Relations and Advocacy, and Anita Bhatia, UN Women’s Deputy Executive Director for Resource Management, Sustainability and Partnerships wrote an amazing blog post about climate action and the female gender for DC EcoWomen. It is well-established that sustainable development and gender parity are intertwined and interdependent. Recognizing this, the UN made their fifth Sustainable Development Goal:  “to achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls.” Women are often the most vulnerable to impacts of poverty and climate change. However, they often play a key role in how their families and communities can build resilience. Education, career opportunities, and healthcare advancements for women are cornerstones of achieving both gender equality and sustainable development.

Let’s Celebrate!

  1. Strike the #EachforEqual pose and post to social media, and share something you are doing in 2020 to contribute to gender parity
  2. Learn empowering self defense at the “Punch, Then Brunch! Women Empowering Women Through Self Defense” event on March 8th.
  3. Buy flowers or chocolates for the amazing females in your life – be sure to look for local or fair trade products (check out your local farmer’s market or neighborhood florist)
  4. Learn about the history of women’s fight for equality, or about current issues we face – check out this list of recommended reads.

How will you celebrate?

Let us know in the comments, or share how you celebrated this day with others at the next DC EcoWomen event!

Additional sources: 

GraceAnne Casto is a DC resident who works as an environmental planner. She likes spending time outdoors, cooking, and reading. Making small steps towards a more sustainable and ethical life is one of her passions.

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By Sabrina Scull

Earth Day Network (EDN) and the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication (YPCCC) recently released a new research report, Climate Change and the American Diet, which looks at Americans’ perceptions and attitudes of plant-based diets and climate change. The research release was hosted at the National Press Club, featuring an engaging panel discussion and a fully plant-based breakfast – an unconventional request of the Club’s caterers, but one that they embraced wholeheartedly.

Many of us in the environmental community, especially those interested in climate issues or food sustainability, are familiar with the issues surrounding our food systems and how they exacerbate climate change. The report authors were interested in learning more about views outside of this echo chamber, looking to draw from a wider representation of American viewpoints. Climate Change and the American Diet analyzes data from surveys of 1,043 American adults of various backgrounds (ages 18 and older). The vast majority of survey participants (94%) described themselves as neither vegetarian or vegan. However, at the same time, 94% expressed a willingness to eat more fruits and vegetables and consume a more plant-rich diet. On top of that, more than half shared a willingness to eat less red meat.

In addition, more than half (51%) of those surveyed indicated that they would be interested in eating more plant-based foods if they were better able to understand the impacts of their food choices on the environment. The results also showed that 70% rarely or never talk about this issue with their friends or family. Furthermore, nearly two-thirds of those surveyed reported that no one had ever asked them to eat more plant-based foods, and more than half indicated that they rarely or never hear about the topic in the media.

The report also shared common barriers to adopting a more plant-based diet, including a lack of knowledge about which plant-based foods to buy, and most importantly – price. Just under half of the survey respondents believe that a meal with a plant-based main course is more expensive than a meal with a meat-based main course. Accordingly, 63% of Americans shared that they would choose more plant-based foods over meat if they cost less. 

It is a common misconception that plant-based foods cost more than their meat counterparts. Indeed, as YPCCC Director Anthony Leiserowitz explained during the research release: “Most plant-based foods are actually cheaper.” This is especially the case with protein sources such as beans, lentils, nuts and even tofu. 

Regardless, it is important to keep in mind that many people in this country struggle with food insecurity and their dietary choices are limited by distance to grocery stores and access to fresh fruits and vegetables. We must amp up the conversation about tackling this inequality and hold our elected officials responsible for breaking down barriers to healthy eating.

There is clearly a great opportunity to share resources with the general public to increase their understanding of how their food choices impact our planet. Overall, it is apparent that we need better communication about these issues, and fast, as our current food consumption is unsustainable in this growing world. 

The first step as environmental advocates is to look critically at our dietary choices and think about how we can eat better for the planet. From there, we can examine why we hold certain perceptions and preferences, then have more honest and open conversations about the impact our food choices.

The Foodprints for the Future campaign at Earth Day Network is working to create widespread awareness of how our food choices impact the environment. We encourage individuals and institutions to #eatmoreplants to help fight climate change with diet change. 

Please visit the Earth Day Network website for more information about the research and to download the full report.

Sabrina Scull is the Food and Environment Campaign Coordinator at Earth Day Network. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Studies – Ecosystems from Binghamton University and a Master of Science in Environmental Conservation from University of Wisconsin-Madison. Sabrina enjoys yoga, cooking delicious vegan food, and making music, particularly with her a cappella group, Makela.

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By Dajah Massey

In recognition of Black History Month, DC EcoWomen celebrates the following eight women for their accomplishments in environmental spaces, their advocacy for the African American community, and their continued impact in the Washington, D.C. area.

Josephine Butler

Josephine Butler confronts DC Mayor Marion Barry, 1978 – photo and caption from https://washingtonparks.net/josephine-butler/

Josephine Butler was born in 1920 in Maryland. She was the daughter of sharecroppers and granddaughter of slaves. Butler moved to D.C. for medical treatment and then became a community leader, environmental activist, and social change agent in the District. Butler started America’s first union of black female laundry workers and was a major contributor to the desegregation of schools. Butler helped to transform Malcolm X Park, also known as Meridian Hill Park, from one of the most dangerous parks in D.C. to a beautiful oasis by planting trees, providing nighttime neighborhood watches, and hosting community education events. 

In a time when environmentalism was not popular, Butler served as a community health educator for the American Lung Association in D.C. and taught thousands of children about the effects of air pollution. In 1995, she served on the D.C. Coordinating Committee for the International Women’s Year. Butler also became a representative on the Mayor’s Health Planning Advisory Committee and served on the D.C. Human Rights Commission. Today the Josephine Butler Parks Center, which overlooks Meridian Hill Park, stands in her honor. 

Click here to learn more about Butler. 

Rue Mapp

Photo from https://outdoorafro.com/team/

Rue Mapp is the founder and CEO of Outdoor Afro, a nonprofit organization that connects African Americans with outdoor experiences and aims to change the narrative of who engages in the outdoors. Outdoor Afro has offices in Washington D.C. and Oakland, California. The organization has selected and trained 80 national volunteers and created leadership teams in 30 states – building a powerful network to nurture a community of black outdoor enthusiasts. Mapp first launched Outdoor Afro as a blog in 2009. The organization now has national sponsors and worldwide recognition. Mapp serves on several conservation boards, was part of the team that launched Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move” initiative, and was appointed program officer for the Stewardship Council’s Foundation for Youth Investment.  She also organized the first all-Black U.S. expedition team to climb Kilimanjaro, the world’s highest freestanding peak. Her proudest accomplishment is being a mother of three. 

Brittany Leavitt

Photo from https://www.britleavitt.com/

Brittany Leavitt is a D.C. influencer — not the social media type, but a real-life changemaker. Leavitt is influencing her community and shaping the minds of D.C.’s youth by teaching preschoolers at the Smithsonian Museum about the natural world. She has also partnered with the North Face and the Girl Scouts to create a new adventure badge that young girls can earn. In addition to mentorship, she is a REI instructor and leads climbing, backpacking, and hiking classes. Her purpose is to build spaces for Blacks, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) to enjoy the outdoors. Brittany was part of the Outdoor Afro first all-black climbing group to summit Mount Kilimanjaro. Through her variety of partnerships, she is diversifying the climbing community. 

Kari Fulton

Photo from https://www.c-span.org/video/?c4693971/user-clip-climate-change-protest

Kari Fulton may be young, but her accomplishments and contributions to the environmental movement are not adolescent. She co-founded the Loving Our City, Loving Ourselves (LOCLOS) campus and community initiative, to build stronger campus and community solidarity on issues of concern in the Washington, D.C. area. She served as the Energy Action Coalition Campus Climate Challenge Coordinator for the Environmental Justice and Climate Change Initiative. She supported and trained hundreds of young people at more than 50 universities, and has become a pioneer organizer working to build up the youth climate movement amongst young people of color, in particular, students at historically black colleges and universities. She is currently a Class of 2020 National Urban Fellow at Georgetown University’s McCourt School of Public Policy, and a Master of Public Management candidate, as well as a Policy Fellow with the Climate Justice Alliance. 

Fulton said: “My hope was for people of color and low-income individuals to get information that will help them take advantage of the growing green movement so that they are not left behind economically or environmentally.” 

 

Lisa Perez Jackson

 Photo from https://archive.epa.gov/epa/aboutepa/administrator-lisa-p-jackson-2009-2013.html

Lisa Perez Jackson is a Princeton University alumnus and a chemical engineer who served as the Administrator of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from 2009 to 2013. She is the first African American to have held that position.  According to the EPA, she “outlined principles to modernize our nation’s 30-year-old chemical management laws, called for unprecedented innovation in drinking water protection efforts, and announced tough standards to clean the air we breathe.” During her time with the EPA, she improved environmental regulation policies and supported communities that were historically underrepresented in environmental initiatives such as low-income areas and vulnerable age groups. Today, Jackson works as Apple’s Vice President of Environment, Policy and Social Initiatives. Each day, she strives to transform Apple into a more environmentally conscious company. 

Dr. Adrienne Hollis

Photo from https://www.ucsusa.org/about/people/adrienne-hollis

Dr. Adrienne Hollis has always been an academic with a passion for the environment. She holds a doctorate degree in biomedical sciences and a law degree with a concentration in environmental law. Dr. Hollis worked on environmental issues in her postdoctoral studies at the Harvard School of Public Health, was employed as a Supervisory Environmental Health Scientist and Toxicologist (Section Chief) at the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, worked as a Project Attorney at Earthjustice, a premier non-profit public interest law firm, and was the Director of Federal Policy at WE ACT for Environmental Justice, in their Washington, D.C. office. Her positions have allowed her to make great contributions and changes within various environmental fields. Today, Dr. Hollis is the Senior Climate Justice and Health Scientist at the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS). She leads the development, design, and implementation of methods for accessing and documenting the health impacts of climate change on communities of color and other traditionally disenfranchised groups. 

Jacqueline Patterson

Photo from https://collegian.com/2016/09/jacqueline-patterson-speaks-about-environmental-injustice-at-diversity-symposium/

As Director of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People’s (NAACP) Environmental and Climate Justice program, Jacqueline Patterson helps the organization achieve its three major goals: to reduce harmful emissions, particularly greenhouse gases, advance energy efficiency and clean energy, and strengthen community resilience and livability. Patterson has worked as a researcher, program manager, coordinator, advocate and activist for women’s rights, violence against women, HIV&AIDS, racial justice, economic justice, and environmental and climate justice.

Leslie G. Fields, Esq.

 Photo from https://www.sierraclub.org/environmental-justice/staff

Leslie Fields, Esq. is another D.C. environmental powerhouse serving multiple organizations to bring environmental improvement and social justice to our nation. Fields is a graduate of Cornell University and the Georgetown University Law Center and the current senior director of Environmental Justice and Healthy Communities for the Sierra Club. She is the former international director of Friends of the Earth-US in Washington, D.C. and is currently an adjunct law professor at Howard University School of Law. Fields serves as a Commissioner on the Joint Center for Economic and Political Studies’ Commission to Engage African Americans on Energy, Climate and the Environment. In a recent interview with The Trouble, Fields said: “What we’re trying to do is work with all kinds of communities to push reducing carbon emissions and remedying in an equitable way, not just marketing solutions that are going to leave communities of color behind. We’ve got all kinds of problems, food justice issues, gentrification—all the stuff in this direct line. We can’t create any kind of solution without dealing with the legacy pollution.”  

Dajah Massey is an environmental engineer and STEM advocate who is passionate about improving our environment and informing underrepresented communities about career options within engineering and STEM fields.  She is also involved with brand management, print modeling, and women empowerment initiatives. 

posted by | on , , , , , , | Comments Off on Five Ways to Green Your New Year’s Resolutions

By Callie Yow


New Year’s Day has come and gone. After envisioning the joy of manifesting the amazing adventure that 2020 will hold — and deciding that I’ll aim to get more sleep, make more time for friends and family, read more books and volunteer — I realized that one thing I left out of my New Year’s resolutions was how to be more green in the new year. I came up with the following guide to help other eco-women live the best (and greenest) year in 2020.

1. Use mesh produce bags 

Those plastic produce bags are convenient for dividing up fruits and vegetables, but there’s a more eco-friendly way. Try using mesh bags (sold at Whole Foods and online here) which are reusable and easy to handle. They’re perfect for holding produce and items from bulk sections. 

2. Reuse glass jars 

Glass jars can be used to make overnight oats, store work lunches or leftover food, brew cold brew coffee, and more. My favorite use for glass jars is making overnight oats — Runningbyrd Tea, a local DC company, brews and sells their tea in pint-sized Mason jars, which happen to be the perfect size for making overnight oats. 

3. Hang dry your delicates (and everything else, too)

As Green America notes in 5 Reasons to Ditch Your Dryer: “In many households, the dryer is the third-most energy-hungry appliance … Air-drying your clothes can reduce the average household’s carbon footprint by a whopping 2,400 pounds a year.” While you may already hang dry your delicate blouses, intimates, and certain fabrics like silk and wool, why not try hanging all your clothes to dry? All you need is a good drying rack. 

4. Participate in Meatless Monday

Meat consumption causes an incredible amount of environmental harm. Meatless Monday is a great goal to have in 2020 because there are many vegan/vegetarian meat substitutes. Instead of consuming meat at every meal, try eliminating it from your diet one or two days a week and opt for delicious alternatives like vegetarian burgers, tempeh or seitan. Follow @MeatlessMonday on Twitter for motivation and recipe ideas. 

5. Make the most of public transportation and rideshares 

The DC Metro (WMATA) services many parts of the District, Maryland and Virginia. There are also other bus and train options throughout the region —  as well as Uber, Lyft, and taxis waiting to be called (follow these tips to stay safe on public transit and rideshares). Limiting how often you drive can save, on average, 20 pounds of carbon dioxide for every gallon of gas you don’t use. If you have to drive to get safely to and from work or otherwise have to use a car, try signing up for a carpool to help others while reducing the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere. 

Callie Yow has a strong love for the natural world and enjoys combining her passions for writing, strategic planning and creative problem solving to advocate for the environment in her personal and professional life.

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By Christy Halvorson Ross

We are in a 24/7/365 battle globally and locally to reduce our carbon footprints, reverse climate change, and improve the health of the Earth.

There are so many ways to contribute on an individual level to a healthier planet…on the roads, in the grocery store, with your consumer habits, and your recycling practices. You can also make a huge impact on your environmental footprint in your own kitchen.  Read on to find out how.

  1. Reduce your food packaging

Shopping at farmer’s markets or being a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) member are the best ways to reduce your food packaging. If you bring your own bags to the farmer’s market, then there is zero packaging between the farmer picking the produce and you putting it in your refrigerator.

The DC area has a plethora of incredible farmer’s markets, many on the weekends and some during the week. Make visiting them your ritual!

With CSAs, you can support farmers directly by purchasing a share for a season or a year. Check out this great list of area CSA’s

As much as I love the produce at Trader Joe’s, I don’t love their food packaging. Many of their items have a cardboard base and then are wrapped in plastic. Whole Foods is a bit better with labels and twist ties on most of their produce.

Wherever you shop, make sure to bring your own produce bags.

If you are a fish or meat eater, you can also bring your own container to the deli/fish counter. Stash one in your bag and have it weighed before the food is put in. This is a great way to reduce your use of plastic.

2. Produce less food waste

Food waste is a big one in the kitchen. At Little Green, we love to come up with ways to use every little bit of the food you have. Following are a few fun tips that ensure you will never need to throw produce away.

  • Veggie stir fries

When the spinach and mushrooms that you had grand plans for begin to look like they may have a day of survival left, it’s time for a stir fry! Saute some onions and add just about any other thing you’ve got in your fridge. Throw in some sesame oil until it’s full of flavor and tender. You can always add coconut milk or hot sauce, and garnish with chopped nuts and cilantro or flat-leaf parsley.

  • Carrot-top pesto

Chop up those amazing carrot top greens from your farmer’s market carrots, and add them to the Cuisinart with pureed walnuts or almonds and some olive oil and salt for a delicious pesto. No recipe needed! Play with the flavors and textures.

  • Smoothies

Are those fresh berries about to go? Throw them in the freezer in a reusable bag (have you heard about stasher bags?) and use them for your next breakfast smoothie.

3. Choose sustainable foods

I have been delving more deeply into the future and the sustainability of food on our planet. Today, we have 7.5 billion people on this planet and 2 billion of them are hungry. By 2050 we’ll have to feed more than 9 billion people. We are discovering foods that require less water and farmland to produce, are grown efficiently, and are highly nutritious. A few examples include:

  • sunchokes [What are sunchokes, you ask? They are also known as Jerusalem Artichokes. They have so many nutrients, fiber, and even protein, and are so easy to grow….we need to start integrating them into our diets more! Check out this elegant salad or main dish that will wow your guests using these inexpensive, modest little gems.]
  • legumes (lentils, beans)
  • dark leafy greens (dandelion greens, kale, swiss chard, beet greens)
  • squashes (delicata, chayote, honeynut)

If you can build these three habits into your routine, you’ll make a big difference for this planet we live on. Have fun with the variety of veggies you get at the market or CSA (and check out our farmer’s market guide here) and enjoy the health benefits too!

Christy Halvorson Ross is the founder of Little Green, which creates sustainable and nutritious recipes, and offers healthy living and plant-based cleanse programs, including food delivery, right here in DC.

posted by | on , , , , | Comments Off on Join a Growing Community of Sustainability-Focused Entrepreneurs

By Patty Simonton

Women around the world are looking at entrepreneurship as a way to make a real and lasting impact in their communities and beyond. 

Women are questioning the lack of healthy, responsible, affordable snack options for our children. They’re wondering why we, as a society, continue to tolerate single-use plastic and fast fashion despite the social and environmental impacts. They’re looking around in our grocery stores and noticing that most of the fresh-cut flowers being sold are imported, mainly from Central and South America, where chemical fungicides and pesticides are frequently used. 

But what’s really exciting is that women are increasingly stepping up to address the problems that they notice around them.

Here in the DMV, Margarita Womack at M’Panadas, and Meredith Cymerman at JaM Treats are proving that snacks can be healthy and delicious. Saba Tshibaka is connecting university students with unique, affordable, lightly-worn clothes, and educating them about the impact of fast fashion at Rendered, Inc. Carey Thompson at Elysian is creating 100% compostable packaging out of industrial hemp to replace single-use plastic, and Sarah Daken at Grateful Gardeners has said enough is enough with the chemicals when it comes to fresh-cut flowers, and is selling organic flowers in Montgomery County, Maryland. 

And they’re not alone. All around country, the number of women-owned businesses is growing.

According to the American Express 2019 State of Women-Owned Businesses Report, growth rates for the number of women-owned business in the United States continue to rise. The share of women-owned businesses stood at only 4.6% in 1972, but has since exploded to 42% in 2019. From 2014 to 2019, the number of women-owned businesses increased 21% (opposed to 9% for all businesses), total employment for women-owned businesses increased 8% (opposed to 1.8% for all businesses), and revenue growth for women-owned businesses was 21%, paralleling that of all businesses (20%). 

It takes investment to support the growth of these businesses, and Crunchbase reported that as of Q3 2019, over $20 billion had been invested into female-founded or co-founded startups, amounting to one of the highest levels in history. 

Yet access to such funds remains out of reach to many, especially for entrepreneurs-of-color. Shelly Bell, the founder of Black Girl Ventures reports that 18% of all businesses in DC are owned solely by women, and 27% are owned by people of color, in an article on the startup ecosystem for black women entrepreneurs in DC for the DC Policy Center. Bell also provides an in-depth look into the many challenges faced by entrepreneurs-of-color, particularly black women, when it comes to accessing the financial resources entrepreneurs need to grow their companies. I encourage anyone working within the startup ecosystem to read her piece. 

At Bethesda Green, our member companies tackle challenges related to the environment by building solutions in the fields of clean energy, water, climate, natural resources, and the zero-waste / circular economy. They also contribute to a sustainable food supply chain by developing innovations in agriculture, food production, manufacturing, distribution, and retail. We ensure that all members learn how to not only maximize their impact, but effectively communicate their impact to customers, investors, and the broader community.

One-half of the member companies in our current portfolio are female-founded or co-founded, an increase from 44% in 2019, and I look forward to growing that number even more in the coming years. 

If you would like to discuss how you can get involved, please don’t hesitate to contact us at [email protected]

If you would like to meet fellow sustainability-focused community members, I encourage you and the sustainability-focused entrepreneurs you know to join us at Bethesda Green for our Community Welcome Event on Thursday, January 16th from 3pm-6pm at our offices in Bethesda, MD. 

Learn more and register here: 

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/community-welcome-event-tickets-84626124015

I believe that there is something truly spectacular about being a part of a large and growing community of people who see what’s possible and are working toward a sustainable future. Together, we can change the world. 

Patty Simonton believes in the power of impactful entrepreneurship and conscious capitalism, and seeks to harness the power of the startup and creative communities to strengthen community engagement and civic responsibility to change the world.  Patty is the Director of Bethesda Green’s Be Green Business program, which supports innovative “eco-entrepreneurs” through an Innovation Lab, and helps local companies obtain B Lab Certification by providing best practices for key environmental and social impact metrics such as sound governance, support for workers, and sustainability.

posted by | on , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Book Review: Equality for Women = Prosperity for All

By Olivia Oudinot

“What walks with four legs in the morning, two legs at noon, and three in the evening is no longer just “man,” even generically. For we need both arms to be strong if we are to crawl; we need both legs to be of equal length and strength if we are to walk and to run. And in old age we all need the additional support of society, whether we are men or women.”

Equality for Women = Prosperity for All, written by Augusto López-Claros and Bahiyyih Nakhjavani, is an underrated gem. Goodreads shows it’s been read by 28 people – compare that to The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck, which has been read by 402,399 people (Goodreads has about 90 million members). 

Created with RNI Films app. Preset ‘Fuji Astia 100F’

My aim is to spread this powerful treatise throughout the D.C. community – and hopefully beyond.

I can’t imagine this book was easy to write. It discusses at length deep issues around the freedom and rights of women – looking at the different forms of violence towards women, tackling the question of culture, addressing how women are perceived when they do work in different countries, and pinpointing the costs of inequality. 

Presented with powerful statistics and studies, this non-fiction collaboration provides a powerful narrative about the importance of the equality of women in relation to the economic prosperity of countries. All in all, as the book states, it does not make any financial (and of course ethical) sense to prevent women from growing and contributing to a country’s workforce. It is completely detrimental to everyone – whether man or woman, teenager or child, politician or farmer – when a woman’s rights are oppressed by society.

One connection that is not discussed at length in the book, however, is the relationship between gender equality and climate change. Gender equality is a powerful driver towards social justice, growth, and achieving sustainable development, according to many organizations worldwide such as the United Nations. “Gender equality is not only a fundamental human right, but a necessary foundation for a peaceful, prosperous and sustainable world,” as stated in Sustainable Development Goal Number 5.

One of the ways to successfully combat the impacts of climate change and to respond to our current ‘climate emergency’ is to pursue social innovation. As we’ve known, we can’t continue “business as usual.” Organizations need to collaborate in creative ways to invent different business models. One key component of successful social innovation is collective impact, which brings together various stakeholders from the private sector, government, and nonprofits to obtain different perspectives. 

However, if there is no gender equality in those organizations, at the highest levels, then how are women supposed to achieve effective solutions if they are not part of the conversation? To ignore the perspective of women is to lose out on opportunities for valuable and insightful contributions. With the urgency our Earth is facing, this is not something to carelessly overlook. 

Overall, I encourage everyone to read Equality for Women = Prosperity for All. It will help you understand more about the issues that women face around the world, and what can be done in the pursuit to eradicate gender inequality.

Olivia Oudinot is a French-American writer and Social Innovation Program Developer. Her research and consulting services focus on sustainability, climate change, women and leadership and social innovation. She holds a Master of Science in Sustainability and Social Innovation from HEC Paris, and a Bachelor of Commerce in Management from Concordia University.

posted by | Comments Off on Self-Care: Tips on Surviving the Holiday Season

By Kendra Wiley

It’s December and you know what that means! Holiday parties, networking socials, galas and gatherings. It’s so easy to look up in January and be exhausted from all the food, booze, and travel. But what if you closed out the decade and entered 2020 feeling refreshed and ready to tackle the year? I have two words for you: self-care.

I have a friend who goes into hibernation when December hits. He gets off social media and is very intentional about taking time to rest and relax during the winter months. This year, I’ve decided to join him. I’m going to read some books, FINALLY learn how to play my acoustic, and spend some time reflecting on 2019 and strategically planning for 2020.

While this won’t be my first holiday season living away from home, it will be the first time I’ve lived 1,400 miles away from home. In the past I’ve found myself in a whirlwind of happy hours, dinners, and brunches and have returned home feeling completely exhausted. Between trying to see all my friends and spend time with family, I barely have any time for myself. I’m writing this post just as much for myself as I am for others. I’m hoping this will jumpstart you to handle the holiday season with intention.

Take Some Time for Yourself

Get back to the basics. What do you enjoy doing? What have you wanted to do that you’ve not had time for? Take this time to snuggle under a blanket and read one of those books on your “to read” list, or browse the shelves at a secondhand book or record store.

Have you always wanted to take guitar lessons, do yoga or meditation, or take a pottery class? Treat yourself. 

Know Your Triggers

This year will be the first time my family and I celebrate the holidays without my grandparents. Knowing that we’ll all feel sad has prepared me as I prepare to travel home for the holidays to try to focus on honoring them and the love and memories they gave us. 

Be Intentional About Who You Spend Time With (and Who You Don’t)

I’ve been missing my close friends something crazy, and I told two of them I needed them to make room for me on their calendars when I get home. And their response was: “Great! We can do a girls’ night with food, wine, and good conversation.” In addition to hanging out with people who bring out the best in you, think about those who are toxic and weigh you down with their complaints and negative energy. Can you either eliminate spending time with these people or cut down if you HAVE to see them?

Be Thankful
No matter what happened in 2019, we all have things we can be thankful for. Spend some time making a gratitude list for the year or journaling about the highlights. And celebrate the wins! Maybe that means going out with friends and having a toast to the all the great things that happened this year. 

Be Selective

Do you need to attend EVERY holiday party, gala, and happy hour? Or can you choose a few, and spend some nights at home binging a new Netflix show? Washington, DC is such a fast-paced city, it’s easy to get caught up in the networking and cool stuff that’s going on and having FOMO. But this may be one of the only times a year you get to slow down.

Don’t Be a People Pleaser

I have a friend with parents who are divorced and both remarried. She and her partner are trying to figure out how to accommodate ALL of the family members for the holidays and split their time between three to five houses. Just hearing her describe the logistics made me exhausted. Navigating between families can be hard, but remember this is your holiday break too.

What three self-care actions can you do this holiday season that are just for you? Make a list and get a friend to do the same so you can hold each other accountable. Here are a few self-care templates to get you started. 

Self Care Toolkit

Develop a Self-Care Plan

Kendra Wiley is a native Texan and health and wellness advocate. She has a Bachelor of Business Administration from The University of North Texas, and a Juris Doctorate from Texas Tech University School of Law.

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The holidays are almost here — which means that the season of eating is about to begin! DC EcoWomen board member Erica Meier shares how you can make a difference for our planet during this holiday season by choosing to eat a plant-based diet.  

By Erica Meier

The international scientific consensus is clear. Report after report paints an alarming yet sobering scene: Global warming is real, it’s happening now and human activities are largely to blame. 

The forecast is bleak: Worsening weather extremes and severe storms, disease outbreaks, altered coastlines, and more, with negative consequences on human health, particularly those in impoverished or marginalized communities. Specifically, according to Oxfam, women around the world, including in the US, will continue to be disproportionately affected by climate change. Which is why climate action must engage and benefit women and girls.  

As alarming as this message is, however, it’s not new. There’s been growing scientific consensus on this topic for years, if not decades, with environmental advocates and others waving red flags the whole time.

The good news is that there’s something more immediate and tangible we, the people, can do right now that will have a lasting collective impact: Eat plants.

There is widespread agreement in the research community, including reports from the United Nations, that raising animals for food is a leading cause of pollution and resource depletion. One of the most important actions each of us can take to reduce our environmental footprint is to choose plant-based foods. 

For example, did you know:  

  • It takes 420 gallons of water to produce just one pound of grain-fed chicken? 
  • The amount of manure produced on factory farms is three times greater than the amount of waste produced by humans — and there are no sewage treatment plants for animal waste? 
  • The production of animal feed, including pastures for grazing, takes up almost 80% of the world’s agricultural land resources?
  • The cattle industry is responsible for 80% of the forest clearing in the Amazon? 

In addition, hidden cameras are routinely capturing the immense suffering forced upon billions of animals each year behind the closed doors of the meat, egg, and dairy industries — and more recently the aquaculture industry.

Imagine how much more efficient and sustainable our food system could be if we ate plants directly rather than funneling them through farmed animals. A recent report by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences put a number on it: the production of plant-based alternatives to meat and dairy is two- to 20-fold more nutritionally efficient per unit of cropland than our current resource-intensive animal-based system.

As stated by the United Nations in 2006: “Livestock are one of the most significant contributors to today’s most serious environmental problems.” In 2010, the UN further declared that “a substantial reduction of impacts [from agriculture] would only be possible with a substantial worldwide diet change away from animal products.”

More recently, a lead researcher on a report published in Science summed it up in The Guardian by concluding: “A vegan diet is probably the single biggest way to reduce your impact on planet Earth … it is far bigger than cutting down on your flights or buying an electric car.”

And yet, the herbivorous elephant in the room remains largely ignored in discussions about how to fight climate change. The answer is literally in our hands: We can use our forks! 

As we continue to work towards policy change and corporate reform, we can also take direct action by diverting our monetary support away from foods that are destroying our planet and causing animal suffering, and instead green our diet with more plants. 

Without a doubt, our food choices matter. Every time we sit down to eat, each of us can stand up for the planet, our health and animals. We can start today simply by making our next meal a plant-based one.

Erica Meier is a DC EcoWomen board member. She is also the president of Compassion Over Killing, a national animal protection organization that hosts the annual DC VegFest and promotes plant-based eating a way to build a kinder, greener, and healthier world for all.