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By: Skylar Petrik

COVID-19 is impacting all of us. If, like many people, you’re cooped up at home, you may find yourself dreaming of park days or beachside hangs with friends. But just because you may be spending less time in nature, doesn’t mean you’re less likely to make eco-friendly life choices. And, while more of us at home means less greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere, there are additional ways you can do more for the environment. Following are a few, simple eco-friendly choices you can make while being cooped up at home. 

  1. Pot a Plant

Add a dose of greenery to your home by potting one or more plants. Pick from easy-to-maintain indoor plants that can enhance your décor and also purify the air, or put them outside where they can get ample sunlight. Don’t forget to water regularly.

2. Opt for Natural Ventilation 

With the hot air that comes with summer in the D.C. area, many of us are likely beginning to turn on the air conditioning. This not only results in a higher electricity bill, but it’s also bad for the environment. Instead, open those windows and doors, and let natural air in. Keep your home naturally ventilated in the morning and evening, and restrict your AC usage to a few hours at noon and night.

3. Switch Off Lights When Not in Use

Every time you leave the room, even if it is for five minutes, switch the lights and fans off. Doing this five times a day will do the Earth some good. Smart bulbs and lights let you control the intensity and on/off features from your smartphone. During the day, let natural light in instead of switching on your room’s light. 

4. Backyard Gardening

Backyard gardening is a great way to grow your own fruits and vegetables and get rid of carbon dioxide in the air to keep your family healthy. Gardening is also a great way to relieve stress. And, a backyard garden reduces food costs and food packaging. 

5. Reuse glass jars

You’ve reached the bottom of a pot of jam, mayonnaise or pickles. Now what do you do with the jar? Reuse it for other food storage, such as wholesale nuts, dried cranberries, or seeds. Or, use it to make crafts. These are great ways to reduce the amount that goes in your recycling and garbage cans each week.

Skylar Petrik is a Community Impact Intern at the United Way of Frederick County. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science and Policy from University of Maryland. She enjoys cardio kickboxing, running, making art and crafts, cooking healthy food, spending time with her family and friends and traveling.

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