Posts Tagged ‘EcoWomen’

posted by | on , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Winners of the 2012 Photo Contest

Winners of the 2012 Contest:

Women and the Environment: ‘Jill on the Turner River’ by Sarah Hackney

Photos of women exploring the natural (and urban) environment.  These can include volunteer events, nature hikes, apple picking, farmer’s markets, etc.

JillontheTurnerRiver_SarahHackney

Natural Landscapes: ‘Yellowstone’ by Kelly Richmond

Your most striking images of the interesting places you’ve traveled!
Yellowstone_Kelly Richmond

Conservation Photography: ‘Capetown, South Africa’ by Aneri Patel

Images capturing environmental degradation or injustices that could motivate eco-friendly behavior.

Visualizing DC: ‘Tulip Petal’ by Yumi Rydlun

This city is our home – Images that showcase all of the fun and interesting things that we do in this iconic area.

Tulip Petal by Yumi Rydlun

Thanks again to everyone who participated last year! Visit out Flickr Group to view more entries and start snapping photos for next year’s contest!


posted by | on , , , , , , , | Comments Off on For Earth’s Sake, Get Organized!

Marin Rose presented at the DC EcoWomen Conference in the “Organize Your Life” workshop. The following is excerpted from her corresponding post on the Functionable Fashionable blog.

Wikimedia Commons

There are a lot about the environmental benefits of being organized. You might think that saving things rather than discarding them is better for the environment – this is sometimes the case. The truth is, though, that the basic principles of organized living support the tenets of being green. And there are, of course, eco-friendly ways to make your home more functional and more fashionable. It’s all about finding the right places for your existing belongings and making plans to reduce future consumption.

The first step in drawing order from chaos is the all-important “purge.” Disposing of large quantities of stuff sounds wasteful but, done thoughtfully, it is actually the very definition of efficiency. Many organizers advise you to sort your belongings into these categories:

  • Keep
  • Donate
  • Sell
  • Trash

Items that you keep will continue to serve a purpose for you and your family. Donated items will benefit others in your community. Sold items also help others, with the added benefit of a profit for you. Only trashed items are environmentally harmful. Ensure that your trashed items are few. In addition to the abovementioned four categories, also create piles to:

  • Recycle
  • Shred

Anything in working order that you are unable or unwilling (due to time or logistical constraints) to sell is eligible for donation. Goodwill, for instance, takes all sorts of clothing, books, music and household items. You might also consider offering things to libraries, schools or shelters.

It’s critical that you securely dispose of sensitive documents – anything displaying your social security number, or financial or medical information – by shredding it. Just remember that the shredded materials are recyclable.

There’s a common misconception that letting go of clutter means throwing away things of value. In fact, when items are disposed of conscientiously, they are actually set free to take on increased value. Unused, unloved items are redirected to new homes, where they will actively serve a purpose or be converted into something else that does so. Not only does this benefit recipients, it also eliminates the need to dedicate resources to the production of a brand new item. In this way, second-hand markets reduce overall resource consumption.

But these at-large efficiencies, though compelling, are not the only benefits of de-cluttering. They are also felt on an individual level. How many times have you purchased something only to discover you already had one – or more – at home? How many perishable items have you had to throw away unopened? When we finally take time to empty out our closets, pantries, attics and garages, we get a full picture of what we already possess. By taking stock of what we have and organizing it in a logical, accessible manner, we cease to over-buy. We save money by eliminating unnecessary purchases, and we save time searching or shopping for the things we need. We re-allocate existing products, thereby saving natural resources – all while providing for our local and global communities.

For young children who are resistant to the idea of cleaning out their bedrooms, framing the subject in an Earth-friendly vein may just help your cause. Kids now are taught in school to be environmentally conscious and often come home with all sorts of dictates for how the household must be more greenly managed. Organizing their own belongings is one way they can take personal action. Talking with your family about mindful consumption is an opportunity to impart valuable life lessons – not only about the environment but about personal organization skills and responsible financial management.

Your tech-savvy children are well equipped to contribute in an even greater way to household efficiency. Today technology presents some of the best opportunities for saving natural resources, as well as your time, space and money. Next month we’ll explore some of the creative ways we can use electronics to get organized and go green.

Wikimedia Commons

Questions for Marin? Send inquiries to [email protected]

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You can be a leader. You already are a leader.

These words of wisdom were heard from Keynote Speaker Dr. Betty Spence at the  First Annual DC EcoWomen Conference: “I’m Here, What’s Next? Building Your Sustainable Career.” Betty spoke to a roomful of women, full of infectious anticipation, about why women need equality in the workplace, and how they might get it.

Dr. Spence said that in her experience, women only want to bring other women up. We all face certain barriers, but we have a network of support to overcome them. This network is of utmost importance, especially in a city like Washington D.C.  The network can include mentors, sponsors, and even just acquaintances from networking happy hours.

Betty’s words coordinated well with the final event of the day:  a networking workshop with Suzy Mink, Director of Principal Gifts for the Mid-Atlantic region of The Nature Conservancy. Suzy touched on several things discussed in the Networking for Introverts post on our blog, and gave even more helpful tools and resources to help women excel at networking.

We were all there to support each other.  But one of the lessons learned that day was that women should not be afraid of the other side of that equation, to ask for favors – even from someone you’ve only just met. In order to create change and parity for women in the workplace, we need a network of support. This network has to start somewhere – someone has to ask first.

If you weren’t able to attend the conference, we’d like to provide you with some support!

Here are Dr. Spence’s 10 Strategies for Success:

  1. Perform beyond expectations – get things done before they are due, do more than what is asked
  2. Build expertise & credibility – make sure you’re getting experience that builds your skills
  3. Take the initiative – if there is an opportunity, don’t hesitate to jump for it
  4. Take risks, step outside of your comfort zone
  5. Diversify your experience. Learn the different parts of your field.
  6. Meet a Mentor. Some say mentors are key to success. In any case, they can only help.
  7. Get known. Talk about what you do, make your successes known.
  8. Find a Sponsor
  9. Network! Meeting people is the only way to break into some careers in D.C.
  10. Take responsibility for your career, own your strengths
Suzy Mink also left us with several insights on networking:
  1. Practice good etiquette
  2. Be willing to engage, to be the one extending a helping hand
  3. Persevere, be resilient in creating contacts
  4. Believe in yourself, be confident
  5. Talk about your aspirations – people like to hear what gets you excited!
  6. Listen. Ask questions that can’t be answered with a simple ‘yes or no.’
  7. Use the virtual world, whatever means you have, to keep in touch
  8. Anyone you meet can be helpful if you make the connection

 

At the end of the day, the EcoWomen were left with feelings of connection, excitement, and empowerment. That excitement was taken to McGinty’s for the networking happy hour, to practice the newly learned skills and discuss the workshops.

Stay tuned for more updates on the workshops themselves! And don’t be afraid to step outside of your comfort zone and make a new connection. You never know who could be the person to lead you to your dream job.

posted by | on , , , , , , | Comments Off on DC EcoWomen Success Story: Jamie Carson

This post was written by DC EcoWomen blogger Dawn Bickett

Welcome to the second installment of DC EcoWomen Success Stories! This month’s success story spotlights Jamie Carson — Founder & Director of C.C. Global, a small business that specializes in environment, resilience & sustainability communications. C.C. Global has most recently launched Envirorun — a running and networking opportunity for the environmental community in Washington, D.C., and other city chapters will be launching soon.

What role has DC Ecowomen played in your career path?

Having a robust network is step one in launching a business, and the DC EcoWomen group empowered my focus. There have been several instances where I have been looking for answers, a connection, a friend in the sector – DC EcoWomen has been there. It is a constant mobilizer for the community through its list-serve, events and workshops.

In one instance, I was planning a press conference before a major event, and I needed to find out – quickly – who was available to attend from the Washington, D.C. area. I sent out somewhat of a environmental journalist S.O.S. and was overwhelmed with the feedback. I thought I may not get a response, and it was the complete opposite. EcoWomen has been an empowering group in so many ways, and I am thankful for this confident group of women helping to back each other, especially when we most need it. Some of these women that reached out that day have remained my closest confidants.

What were the steps you took to get to where you are?

Being a Nebraska native, I grew up surrounded by an environmental-based economy whether it be agricultural practices, conservation research or energy/development projects. In college, I studied environmental journalism, and was most interested in energy issues and the challenges that are associated with resource scarcity.

I received good advice from someone when I got out of school: You’re not going to get your dream job right way. You’ve got to start somewhere and always shift your path back to your passions. When I graduated I first worked at a small local newspaper, but I ended up finding my next job with a company that did journalism and was focused in the private sector. I would cover stories about matters that were important to industrial work. Later, I moved up to a management role, which introduced new skills to learn.

Anywhere I had an opportunity, I would filter my environmental background into what I was working on, whether talking about sustainability on the railroad or how moving freight by train can be more fuel efficient than by truck. And all the while I was building important skills in communications. It’s important to take every opportunity that you’re given and think of it in an optimistic way. Down the road, you can always center your path where you really want to be.

I went from there to Washington, D.C., and started working in the nonprofit world. I worked for the Global Adaptation Institute as director of communications for three years before launching my own small business.

Were there any major hurdles that you faced to get where you wanted to be?

We will continuously experience hurdles, but the most important thing is staying focused on the things that make you happy in your career, and make sure that even if your path goes off in a different direction for a while that you come back.

I really wanted to work right away in the environmental field, but when I think about how my career has progressed from a 1,000-foot-view, I’ve realized that I could not be doing what I am now if I hadn’t had those opportunities. Running my own business is probably one of the most challenging and exciting things that I’ve done to date, and it was those past experiences coupled with the support of my family and my network that have made all the difference.

It’s not just about what you’ve done, but all the people who helped you along the way. It’s important to remember that all of the relationships you create, every job you’ve had, come full circle.

Do you have any advice for women just beginning their work in an environmental field?

It’s all about your knowledge base, vision and projection. Always continue to learn, read and follow the news. If you believe in yourself, as well as your work, expertise and colleagues, you will evoke a confidence that makes boundaries and differences insignificant.

Can you tell us more about Envirorun?

Envirorun is a running and networking opportunity for the environmental community – bringing together all players in the space from academia and science, multilateral, media, NGOs, public and private sector and foundations. D.C. is rich in environmental discussion, and is even more so since the State of the Union Address by President Barack Obama mentioned climate change as a top U.S. priority. The time is ripe to do something about it, and getting people together and talking is a big step.

Envirorun

Jamie Carson can be reached via email at [email protected]. Visit C.C. Global online at www.ccglobal.US, @ccglobalUS (Twitter) and C.C. Global (Facebook). Anyone interested in receiving information about Envirorun events, please subscribe at envirorun.com/subscribe and for more information visit envirorun.com/dc, @envirorun (Twitter) and Envirorun (Facebook). 

posted by | on , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Channeling your Inner Wonder Woman… and Other Tips for Body Language in the Workplace

In the workplace, certain things about your body language come as second-nature. If you’re tired during a meeting, you might slouch in your chair. Maybe you get distracted while someone is talking to you, so you glance around the room. Without even realizing, you touch your neck for comfort in a stressful situation.

Body language is surprisingly important in the workplace. The way you move and act may have unintended impacts on how others perceive you, and how you perceive yourself. Body language can make the difference between getting that extra raise or getting stuck on the bottom. Body language can affect the job experience in ways that you might not expect.

Many situations arise in which you have to prove yourself and show your worth – these are the situations where the importance of body language comes into play.

Here are some “do”s and “don’t”s for body language in the workplace:

DON’T

Get into positions of insecurity. Certain mannerisms can give off an air of nervousness or uncertainty. People respond to confidence and determination in the workplace.

  • Touching one’s neck is often subconscious reaction to stress.
  • Keeping ankles crossed is also a sign of restraint or discomfort.
  • Having your arms crossed can show you are holding something back.
  • Slouching too deep into your seat is also a bad idea.

In general, any manner of curling or folding into yourself shows insecurity.

DO

Take a position of dominance. This can take many forms – in general, you want to lengthen your posture and widen your stance.

  • Sit with your arm propped up on the chair next to you.
  • Keep your ankles side by side instead of crossed.
  • Keep your arms open when engaging with someone to show you are open
  • Lean forward to express interest.
  • Make eye contact, especially during a handshake.

If you’re having a hard time figuring out your “dominance” stand, just think of Wonder Woman. How would she pose? How would she handle the situation?

Even before a stressful situation, body language may even be more important – including when nobody’s watching. Amy Cuddy’s research, profiled in a TedTalk, shows that getting into a position of power and dominance, even for two minutes, can change your hormone balance, and have a positive impact on how you handle stress.  Likewise, being in a position of confinement can negatively impact your hormones, and possibly worsen the outcome of a negotiation.

Flickr Creative Commons

If you have an office with a closed door, Cuddy even suggests standing up on your chair or desk (if it’s safe, of course!) for an extra power-stance boost. This is not a suggestion to stand on your desk during a job interview! But beforehand, and in the privacy of your own office, it doesn’t hurt to feel like you’re on top of the world.

It’s time for Ecowomen to become Wonder Women – or  EcoWonder Women!

Do you want to learn more about how to become a EcoWonder Woman, and advance your career? Join us at the First Annual EcoWomen Conference: I’m Here, What’s Next? Building a Sustainble Career!

posted by | on , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Escape and Be Free in Washington D.C.

Washington D.C., the city of young professionals and fast politics, is one of the hardest working cities in our country. And as an environmentalist, it can be particularly easy to get disenchanted with politics. Sometimes you just need to escape.

It’s important to get away and remind yourself what you’re working for. To get lost in the woods, to paddle on a river. To remember why you are working for the environment in the first place. To feel at peace.

The pockets of nature and beauty dispersed throughout the city make DC wonderfully unique. Even in the midst of the hectic atmosphere, it is possible to find stillness in nature.

If you’re looking for your next get-away, here are some places to escape to without leaving city borders:

The National Mall

Although this is probably the most well-known (a.k.a. tourist-frequented) getaways, there are many pockets of beauty that aren’t the first stop on a segway tour. The World War II Memorial usually is less crowded than the others – and in the summer heat, the fountain is a quenching hiatus. You can also take the long walk around the tidal basin, which might seem too daunting for tourists, but is perfect for the DC native trying to escape!

Rock Creek Park

Washington D.C.’s most ubiquitous secret, Rock Creek Park extends all throughout the city. Almost anywhere you are, a patch of this Park is likely nearby. If this park is good enough for 200 deer then it is good enough for a peaceful escape.

National Zoo

Just a few steps can transport you to a foreign land with pandas, elephants, and dragons! Komodo dragons, at least. Go to the zoo to gaze into the eyes of a creature you’ve never seen in person before. Maybe you will see your own image deep in its the eyes – maybe it will awaken your inner tiger. (Or your inner penguin, no one’s here to judge.)

Capital Crescent Trail

This biking and hiking path that runs along the Potomac goes on for miles. It extends Northwest out of DC, eventually into Maryland. When the trees start enveloping the landscape, you may forget the city is just a mile away. Grab a bike and go if you want to get really far away – and be able to find your way back after.

Additionally, if you don’t mind leaving city borders (or at least crossing the river to Virginia):

Roosevelt Island

The monument that got separated from the mall. The Theodore Roosevelt monument rests in the middle of this tiny island, smack dab in the middle of the Potomac. With DC on one side, and Arlington on the other, the stillness lies in the middle of the noise. The island doesn’t feel that small when you’re on it – there are footpaths, riverbanks, and an expansive open area around the monument itself.

Gravelly Point – Ronald Reagan International Airport

This is secretly my favorite spot in all of D.C… well, I guess the secret’s out now. A simple, humble park on the Potomac, Gravelly Point is windy enough to be a respite on a hot day. And, the national airport is approximately 20 feet away. To be able to see airplanes heading towards you at top speed, and take off just barely over your head, is exhilarating. You feel like you can almost reach out, grab onto the wheels, and take a ride.


Next time you’re stressed
about the inequality of women in the workforce or after five oil spills in one week, you can go to one of these getaways and clear your head. When you come back, you’ll be ready. Ready to walk into work and ask for what you want. Ready to take care of yourself. Ready to jumpstart your career. Ready for change.

Wikimedia Comons

posted by | on , , , , | Comments Off on Toxins in the Environment, Toxins in Your Body

The following is a post by DC EcoWomen boardmember Alison Alford.

http://myggm.org

I recently attended a fantastic DC EcoWomen EcoHour on environmental toxins and their effects on your body. I was spell-bound as Heather White, Executive Director of the Environmental Working Group, told us that EWG preformed a study on ten Americans and found levels of harmful chemicals in their blood, including BPA, mercury, phthalates, and triclosan. EWG knew that these toxins didn’t come from the air, water, soil, or food, because the ten blood donors were newborns.  Toxins are showing up everywhere – in our cleaning products, produce, cosmetics and sunscreens, and they are flushed down the drain and polluting our rivers and oceans.

Fortunately for us and our children, there are numerous resources to use when trying to find the best product to clean, cook, or consume.  Heather advised us that knowledge is indeed power – and that our voices are the best weapon to protect us from chemicals in every day products.

Find out about cosmetics, cleaning products, sunscreen and more on EWG’s website:

Once we educate ourselves on toxins in the environment, we need to speak up, and to speak up oftenWrite a letter to your member of Congress to let them know that you will no longer accept toxins in your sunscreen and cleaning products.  Sign a petition to stand up to pesticide lobbyists.  Show your support with your wallet by purchasing environmentally-friendly cosmetics, produce, and cleaning products.  But, most importantly, become educated on the dangers of toxins in the environment – because then you will know how to keep those toxins out of your body!

Want to read about the right things to put in your body? Check out our post on nutrition and malnutrition in women.

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Is a calorie just a calorie?

Obesity is one of the most visible problems in our country. But it may be masking another overarching chronic health problem – malnutrition.

In a country with so many choices, so much inexpensive food everywhere, and a McDonalds in every town big or small, why would we have to worry about malnutrition?

We pride food on being inexpensive and convenient above all else – above sustainability, above quality, and above nutritional content. As a result, the grocery aisles have become stuffed with packaged, processed foods designed for low cost and long shelf-life. Unfortunately, the nutritional value of these foods is often little to none. So while most Americans are certainly getting enough to eat, they are not consuming the nutrients that are essential for health.  Nutrient deficiency-related diseases can happen to anyone – even an EcoWoman.

Everyone has a different diet, and risks for possible nutrient deficiencies. And women in particular face risk of certain nutrient deficiencies. Here are five common nutrient deficiencies in American women:

1. Vitamin D

Vitamin D aids the auto-immune system – a deficiency may lead to increased susceptibility to colds and the flu. Vitamin D’s role with the immune system also helps prevent chronic diseases such as diabetes. More commonly known is vitamin D’s critical role in calcium absorption and in regulating the nervous system. Women have an increased risk of developing osteoporosis than men, so maintaining bone health is particularly important.

2. Calcium

Calcium and Vitamin D go hand in hand in terms of bone health. Osteoporosis is one of the most common diseases among women – over half of women over the age of 45 are affected. The risks of osteoporosis are more deadly than one might think – bones degraded from osteoporosis causes about 250,000 hip fractures in the U.S. each year, resulting in a 20 percent risk of death.

3. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Over 90% of Americans have too little Omega-3 Fatty Acids in their diet. As an essential component of the brain (60% of brain material is made from omega 3 fatty acids), a deficit can lead to learning disabilities, such as ADHD, or contribute to depression. It also may contribute to obesity or heart disease.

4. Folic Acid

Folic acid is extremely important for women that are pregnant or planning to get pregnant. Folate helps protect against a number of embryonic malformations, including neural defects. Also, advanced folate deficiency can lead to anemia. And speaking of anemia…

5. Iron

For vegetarians, iron can be the biggest challenge. Iron-deficiency anemia causes extreme fatigue, dizziness, and an increased heart rate – so much so that it can be difficult to simply walk up a hill. And in the longer term, anemia can have severe impacts, leading to heart disease or heart attacks. The World Health Organization considers iron deficiency the number one nutritional disorder in the world.

With all the research on the dangers of vitamin supplements, it is important – and increasingly difficult – to get these nutrients from natural sources. There are exceptions, of course – vegetarians might take iron supplements to ensure their iron stays at healthy levels and prevent anemia. But they should always be supplemented with the real thing – iron pills could be taken with quinoa, spinach, and lentils.

One thing to take away from this is that maintaining nutrient health is HARD. It can be very difficult to get all the nutrients you need in a natural way, without relying on a multivitamin. But there are experts that can help. Now, I’m no expert – just an EcoWoman trying to stay healthy. For a chance to learn from real experts, DC EcoWomen is hosting a workshop. Dr. Melissa Windsor and Dr. Karen Threlkel of the Restorative Health Center for Integrative Medicine will talk about why we’re malnourished, what the common deficiencies are, and how simple changes in your food choices can make a difference.

A calorie is NOT just a calorie. A nutrient-filled calorie means a whole lot more. In time, it could mean everything.

Learn more about the workshop “Overfed Yet Undernourished” and reserve your ticket.

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By Katrina Phillips

DC EcoWomen with Green Living Project founder Rob Holmes In partnership with the UN’s World Environment Day, Green Living Project recently held a Washington, DC, premiere to share their latest films.  Green Living Project is a filmmaking and marketing company that creates short films to showcase examples of sustainability in action.  DC EcoWomen was a promotional sponsor for the event and several EcoWomen attended, including myself.

Our evening began with a short local spotlight story from Sam Ullery, the Schoolyard Garden Specialist for DC’s education office.  I had no idea the DC school system had such a position, and it was great to see Sam’s passion to provide students in the area access to local, nutritious food.

Elisabeth Guilbaud-Cox from the UN Environment Program Regional Office for North America also joined the screening.  She applauded the audience for attending because as our 7 billion-person world ever increases demand on resources, “we need to empower ourselves to bring about change”.

DC EcoWomen was a local sponsor for the event.The six films screened at the event included stories from the US and Central America, each focusing on a local sustainability project’s success.  Issues ranged from agroforestry in Belize to refurbishing bicycles “rescued” from landfills in Chicago.  It was a great reminder to us that all it takes is regular people with a passion for change coming together to reach a sustainability goal.

Green Living Project founder and chief storyteller Rob Holmes was our guide through the films of the evening, and shared how each film was  made during our viewing.  We ended with a preview of the latest films from Africa, and the footage looked stunning!  I can’t wait to see them!  Rob also shared that he is currently seeking projects to highlight for their upcoming trip to Asia, so contact Jenny at Green Living Project if you know of great stories to share.   All in all it was an informative ininspirational event – and I even won a door prize!

posted by | on , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Thriving At Thrifting

By Kate Seitz

 

 

Growing up, the extent of my thrift store experience involved sifting through racks of old t-shirts at the Salvation Army. Dated Cleveland Indians gear that perhaps no longer seemed relevant to a disgruntled fan. A cast-off souvenir from Jamaica. An outgrown pee-wee hockey league championship memento. For whatever reason, my girlfriends and I couldn’t get enough of these worn tees, and the more random the motif, the better.
It wasn’t until a few years back that I realized the multi-faceted benefits of thrifting and really came to view it as a means of discovering a wide range of unique items (clothing, home décor, kitchen tools, you name it) that still have plenty of life left, and for a fraction of the off-the-shelf price. I have since vowed to embrace my admiration for all things vintage and recycled and take the time to find distinctive, second-hand items instead of rushing to the nearest mall to buy new.
I’ve stepped foot in pretty much every thrift and consignment store within a 15 mile radius. I’ve hounded Craigslist for many furniture and athletic equipment needs. I’ve discovered a charming cluster of antique stores out in Loudoun County, Virginia. And I’ve even turned up some great vintage shops on Etsy. My favorite finds thus far include a hand painted dish set; my current road bike; various vintage necklaces; a leather couch and matching chair; a beautiful oak-framed mirror dated 1906; and various dollar-a-piece picture frames and flower vases, many of which I used as décor at my wedding reception and are now sprinkled around my apartment. All for a pittance of what it would cost to buy these new.

1) A sample of my thrifted jewelry collection

2) A hand painted dish set I found at an antique store.

 

 

Thrifting sometimes gets a bad rap for being tricky and tiresome. It does indeed require patience to sift through other people’s cast offs. It sometimes can lead to buried treasure, and other times leave you empty handed. But boy, is it a joyous occasion when you dig up a worthwhile piece. To me, giving a second life to thrifted finds is simply recycling what would otherwise end up in a landfill. Our country’s consumer-driven nature constantly bombards us with reasons to buy new, upgrade, purchase the latest and greatest. Some of this may be necessary, and in fact good for innovation and economic growth. But many times, it’s downright wasteful.

These days, whenever I feel the need to make a purchase, I first evaluate whether a thrifted item would fit the bill. This mantra continues to lead me to unique finds that have an interesting history, or that perfectly worn-in feel. It truly is a win-win, both for the environment and the wallet. The next time you’re looking for new workout tees, jewelry, dishware, a new kitchen table…whatever!….I encourage you to first check out the multitude of options out there for buying second hand (Craigslist, Etsy, a local thrift/antique/consignment store, a neighborhood yard sale (my fave, especially in the summertime!), an EcoWomen clothing swap) and see what treasures you uncover. Happy hunting!