Posts Tagged ‘change’

posted by | on , , , | Comments Off on How to Keep Inspiring Change for the Environment – Both Locally and Worldwide

By Tara Lundy, DC EcoWomen member

We all know how important the health of our planet has become. Each year, startling statistics are coming out about the rise of ocean levels, the amount of pollution and number of animals suffering from climate change. With the Earth needing us to be on its side more than ever, it’s so important to keep inspiring others to get involved. It can be easy for us to get caught up in our own worlds but helping to make a difference in our Earth’s health should continue to be a top priority.

Use Social Media for Good

There’s no doubt that social media has its fair share of good and bad, but when using social media to inspire change, it can be an amazing tool. Simply retweeting a tweet or using the right hashtag can yield extraordinary results and help make a difference. If there’s an eco-friendly campaign going on that you feel passionate about, don’t be afraid to share the information with your own followers. Not only will this help reach people around your community, but it could reach your other followers who may live in different areas. If you want to learn more about how you can continue to help, simply searching a hashtag such as #Gogreen or #Zerowaste can give you ideas and inspiration for living a greener lifestyle.

Encourage Others to Invest in Healthier Options 

One of the biggest ways that you can help make change happen is by inspiring change with your peers. By no means does this mean you have to preach your viewpoints on others, but if you feel like a close friend or family member is interested in helping the environment, don’t be afraid to give them some helpful advice. The best pieces of advice to give are the ones that can be easily applied. Being sustainable is something that you can gradually apply within your lifestyle. Buying locally is also an easy suggestion, especially with farmers markets about to be in full force come peak crop season. Buy from companies that share an eco-friendly mission. Simply supporting a company who specializes in making eco-friendly hair color is enough to help make a meaningful difference. You’ll find through your search that these kinds of companies come in all forms, from clothing brands to food companies to cleaning products.

Keep the Education Going

Knowledge is key. With changes constantly occurring, we have to stay mindful of what’s continuing to go on in the world. While you may find yourself completely up to date, others may not. There are ways that we can continue to educate others that can be inclusive but also fun. One of the easiest ways is through a continuous cycle of sharing important information such as articles and videos on your social media channels. Since our younger years are our most formative ones, it’s important that our children grow up with knowledge of what’s currently happening with the environment. We can continue to help bring environmental awareness to our future leaders through environmental educational books and TV shows.

If you’re looking for more interactive environmental activities, a great idea is to take people to the zoo. This will give you a chance to take in some beautiful animals and absorb information on how these animals need a healthy amount of biodiversity to continue thriving.

Continue to Help Single-Handedly 

At the end of the day, the person who can be held most accountable is you. While encouraging others to get involved is always a wonderful idea, the person who can most easily help to make a difference is yourself. Continue to make eco-friendly lifestyle choices such as picking up a piece of trash on the side of the road or drinking out of a reusable water bottle. No matter how small these actions may seem initially, doing things like this in your daily life can be enough to help make a change and inspire the people around you to make eco-friendly decisions as well.

No matter what eco-friendly lifestyle choices you make, continuing to fight for the environment is the greatest way to keep inspiring change and make a meaningful difference. Let us know how you continue to inspire change for the environment in your comments below!

Tara is a DC EcoWomen member who is a Colorado native. She is passionate about fighting for for the environment along with animal rights. When she’s not writing, she’s taking her dogs for hikes and visiting the local aquarium.

Photo 1 by Ross Findon on Unsplash; Photo 2 by William Iven on Unsplash; Photo 3 by Brooke Lark on Unsplash; Photo 4 by Ben White on Unsplash; Photo 5 by Pawe? Czerwi?ski on Unsplash

posted by | on , , , , | Comments Off on A call to action for sustainability enthusiasts at work

sustainability-advocate-blog

By Brittany Ryan

From launching petitions to marching in protests, I’ve come a long way since my environmental activist days. Though still an advocate, I’ve found a different way to channel passion into action. Through my experiences in both the academic and professional sustainability field, becoming a green leader in the workplace has proven to be a very effective strategy.

The first step in triggering a catalytic force behind any social movement is to be the change. The power of Gandhi’s principles resonates with all of us out there trying to cultivate our lifestyle with the hope of inducing a societal paradigm shift. If a more sustainable world is what we wish to see, we must start by polishing our personal habits.

But the next step to inflicting change is motivating others. Even if you’re still working out the kinks in the process of “greenifying” your life, take a leadership role and transform the status quo. Nothing is more frustrating than a person or motivated group that cries out a problem, relentlessly blaming another party, and yet fails to play an active role in the solution. I’m asking all of you eco-folks out there to take what you know and lead – specifically, at work.gandhi

Start with materials management

Somewhere along the path of development, we failed to acknowledge and incorporate life cycle assessments and holistic supply chain management into our operative norms. This led to poor materials management practices, increasing waste, economic inefficiencies, and environmental degradation. Although our nation’s recycling and recovery practices improved over time, as of 2013 we still send over 50% of our generated materials to a landfill. After accounting for recycling and recovery processes, the top three wasted materials are food, plastic, and paper, respectively. This week, take a look at your office trash and recycling receptacles and you’ll notice those three items comprise a majority of what we toss.jdmmm

Your workplace provides great opportunity to inspire change, and I speak from experience. Since joining my company about a year ago, I’ve made it my mission to lead an internal sustainability initiative. Working diligently with my team, we identify opportunities for improvement, promote educational awareness, and implement real solutions. Our materials management efforts bumped our landfill diversion rate to an impressive 86%. The impact is rippling; the staff is eager to
become more educated on the subject, actively share these practices at home, and offer new ideas for building our internal sustainability operations. Our community relationships evolved as we share similar goals with the municipality and help to promote a local veteran-employed organization.

A leader in the workplace does not need to rely solely on passion and the “do-good” feeling to convince an organization to make changes. Waste, by the very nature of its name, is inefficient. Nationwide, major companies – think Google – are capitalizing on revamping their materials management because it not only builds their public relations, but it makes business sense. Better management of materials allows for cost savings through a reduction in use or repurposing and serves as a potential revenue stream.

Waste is more than just what we send to a landfill. Materials management encompasses the materials coming into the company, the way products are used, and the manner in which they are sorted for discarding. Digging into this process sheds light on a breadth of adjustments that reduce materials use and save the company money, ranging from office supplies to kitchenware to cleaning products and beyond. 

Next steps

Start by taking part of a sustainability committee, and if one doesn’t exist, investigate how to build one. Use a team to brainstorm positive initiatives that benefit both the company and its staff – make that business case! Understand the current operative practices and measure the company’s performance over time. Share ideas and results with the staff at large, and solicit their input as a continuous feedback loop. And definitely always champion successes through newsletters, social media, and other communication channels to give credit where it’s due and motivate others to do the same.

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The benefits to leading change in the workplace are multifaceted. Not only does it accomplish altruistic goals of making the word a better place, but also enables you to distinguish yourself amongst a pool of very competitive thought-leaders further advancing professional development. Becoming an agent of change is empowering and as awareness builds and an increasing number of communities (whether a neighborhood, office, or city) manage resources more efficiently, the sooner sustainability transforms from a choice to the everyday norm.

To find out more information about commercial recycling, click here.

Born and raised on the Jersey coast, Brittany became a resident of the DC Metro Area in 2013. She earned her Master of Public Policy from the University of Maryland in 2015 and has since been working for an energy management and sustainability consulting firm in Falls Church, VA. Brittany also has a real knack for pickling cucumbers and making guacamole.